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Nigeria Needs More Entrepreneurship And Government Has A Role

By Gbadegesin Tosin 

Entrepreneurship is an important factor in the development of any nation. Entrepreneurs are responsible for taking calculated risks that open up doors to progressively higher levels of economic growth. If it were not for them, the world would never have known such marvels as the wheel, electricity or the Internet, to name just a few.

Entrepreneurs are the veritable backbone on which the world and modern ideas continue to develop. The magnitude and reach of their contributions, however, extend much beyond the world of business and economy, and to them goes irrefutable credit for the growth and evolution of societies at large. Developed nations across the world owe their current prosperity to the collective effort of intrepid entrepreneurs, on whose innovation also rests the future prosperity of much of the developing world.

The role of government in entrepreneurship development in Nigeria became significant after the Nigeria civil war (1967-70). Since then, there has been increased commitment of government to entrepreneurship development especially after the introduction of the Structural Adjustment (economic) Program (SAP) in 1986 and establishment of agencies such as National Directorate of Employment (NDE), National Open Apprenticeship Scheme (NOAS), Small and Medium Enterprise Development Association of Nigeria (SMEDAN) etc.

In early 2000s, entrepreneurship studies were introduced into the Nigerian educational system, especially at higher institutions as a mandatory course. The Centre for Entrepreneurship Development (CED), which has the objective of teaching and motivating students of higher institutions (especially in science, engineering and technological (SET)) to acquire entrepreneurial, innovative, and management skills, was established. This was done to make Nigerian graduates self-employed, create job opportunities for others and generates wealth in the process.

The scope of financial freedom and flexibility that entrepreneurialism allows is a means to simultaneous individual and national prosperity. If this holds true for economies around the world, it has especially. Traditional Nigerian entrepreneurship began in a climate of economic stagnation and as a purely survivalist endeavor. Dismal human development indices, unemployment and infrastructure deficits resulted in the evolution of a massive informal economy that depended almost exclusively on personal initiative and hazardous risk-taking capacity.

The return of democracy in 1999 ushered in a period of economic reforms and a renewed focus on enterprise development as viable means to sustainable growth. Nigerian leaders initiated a massive program of disinvestment and financial deregulation aimed at boosting business development across the Micro, Small and Medium Enterprise (MSME) space.

One of the principal problems is the fact that Nigeria is not perceived as a promising business destination. The high cost of doing business, corruption and systemic flaws in the country’s economic policies have cumulatively succeeded in keeping off potential investors. Massive infrastructural deficits, particularly with regards to roads and electricity, are further turn-offs. The most significant aspect of the problem, however, is Nigeria’s nascent and shaky polity, constantly under threat from civil intolerance and rising religious extremism.

Social problems, growing out of deplorable human development indicators in the absence of inclusive growth, form the second significant obstacle for Nigeria in utilizing the benefit entrepreneurship brings. The status of women and their traditionally limited involvement in entrepreneurial activities is a significant drawback from the perspective of rapid social and economic growth. The issue is further compounded by a catastrophic divide in the condition of rural and urban populations. People exposed to entrepreneurship frequently express that they have more opportunity to exercise creative freedoms, higher self-esteem, and an overall greater sense of control over their own lives.

Entrepreneurship promotes liberty and increase economic growth by:

  1. Producing and distributing goods and services to satisfy certain public needs. To fulfill this task, businesses developed flexibility and constantly researched on consumer demands.
  2. Creating job opportunities; More than that, most jobs created are productive jobs.
  3. Providing income sources: income that business provides is by no means restricted to the profit its owners get. It pays salaries and wages to its employees, and this way, makes the whole business world go round: they spend the money they earn buying all kinds of goods and favour further development of business ventures.
  4. Contributing to national well-being: by means of taxes businesses pay to government (though, grudgingly as its management is hardly ever justified), it is possible for the government to maintain all kinds of public and social institutions and services;
  5. Helping to enlighten and educate people, thereby encouraging their further personal growth.

Entrepreneurship is the foundation of any developed nation. For Nigeria to reap the full benefits of a dynamic and evolving economy however require the overcoming of entrenched social, financial and political hurdles. The government must increasingly work to improve the ease of doing business by developing and implementing more pro-market policies and making the entire business environment more attractive to investors. Also, improvements and reforms in education and international participation are crucial for Nigeria to shake off its third world heritage and achieve the full breadth of its economic potential.

 

Republished from AfricanLiberty.org

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